Articles - East Coast Gold Weightlifting Team
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The short answer- NO! In order for you to make the adaptations necessary for strength development, you must undergo performance suppression. Training is nothing more than: Performance Suppression (Feeling and Performing Poorly) + Recovery (Long Term and Short Term) = GAINZ ! (Translation of that Suppression into an Adaptation) So many times throughout a training cycle and leading up to a meet, I hear athletes say “I’m getting weaker” or “my program isn’t working, I need to try something different”. During those times, as a coach, it is so important to educate the athlete on WHY they are feeling and performing poorly. The biggest mistake an athlete can make is to abandon the current training program during these times. Very often, the athlete will confuse this Performance Suppression with the thought that they are actually getting weaker! Light weights feel heavy- those same weights that were once squatted for multiple reps......

I DON’T KNOW BUT I’VE BEEN TOLD PERSISTENCE AND CONSISTENCY WILL NEVER GROW OLD Seriously folks? Name a lifestyle or training issue that won’t be worked out with a heavy dose of persistent and consistent effort. waiting, waiting…. A Weightlifter working toward a national qualifier, CrossFit athlete looking to make that jump to regionals, or a Soccer Dad yearning to go from dad bod to hot rod can all accomplish their goals by being persistent and consistent in their approach to both lifestyle and training. If you are having issues making training gains accessing and sharpening lifestyle habits that will increase health and lead to higher performance. Folks often go about this ass backward opting for more training. Believe me, throwing a 90 minute fire fight into a shitty life style five days a week will only lead to injury and frustration. Before embarking on any new or improved trainings......

This week on the Everyday Weightlifter Phil and I discussed Warming Up and Prepping. In my mind, each serves a separate and important purpose. Warming up serves 2 specific functions: Raising Your Bodies Temperature and Mentally Checking you in. It should be a short, general and low impact. Raising your bodies temperature should be as simple as finding the least stressful way to break a sweat. You can do this mindlessly sitting in a sauna, jumping on a rower, skipping a rope, or sliding away on an elliptical. Given the choice, I go sauna. Checking in comes down to putting your phone down and beginning to focus. For me its as simple as writing down my sets and reps for the session ahead. Some folks have a specific chicken eating, line jumping, ritual. It could be as simple as turning your hat backward or playing a particular song. Whatever you do......

Totten Training Systems announces the latest course in the certification series. Coaches Education and Lifting Certification (CELC) Everyone knows how important a positive, efficient weight room is in the production of top level athletes and teams. Give your teaching and coaching in the weight room a better direction! Learn more about the CELC and our other offerings on the courses page....

Leo Totten, MS Head Coach, Totten Training Systems Head Coach, East Coast Gold WL Team One of my favorite things to do first thing in the morning is to tune in to Mike and Mike on ESPN.  I like to catch up on the latest scores and the back and forth banter of two very cool sports talk show hosts.  Mike and Mike often bring on special guests who offer their expert opinions on the topic of the day. Herm Edwards, an outstanding football coach and now expert analyst, was brought in to discuss the professionalism (or lack thereof) of a particular pro athlete.  His perspective was very enlightening and his point was how he breaks down athletes into two basic categories – those who are “interested” and those who are “committed”. As a coach, how many times have you come across athletes who talk a big game and have......

Leo Totten, MS Totten Training Systems, LLC USAW Level 5 We all have been inundated with information on how beneficial the Olympic lifts can be as part of the strength coach’s repertoire – an effective tool in the toolbox.  Many of the physical attributes that athletes need are enhanced by doing the Olympic lifts properly: Ability to exert forces as well as to absorb forces Maximum force production as quickly as possible (explosive power) Total body movement / Multi-joint movement mimicking sport movement Closed kinetic chain Triple joint extension Functional core stability However, many coaches use the Clean as the sole Olympic lift and forget the benefits of getting some Snatch training into their programs as well. What is the Snatch and what does it accomplish?  The pull pattern is basically the same as the Clean, but the difference is where the “catch” or “receiving position” occurs – overhead instead......